Commercial Fire Door Tips

Fire Doors in Your Commercial Building: What You Need to Know

Only in the event of an actual fire or emergency situation do most people fully appreciate fire-rated doors. Business owners, on the other hand, have a better understanding of the importance of fire doors. In the event of an actual fire, these doors can serve an important role in keeping flames and smoke from spreading to different parts of the building. They can also serve as a means of easy escape in case of an emergency.

What Is a Fire Door?

Fire-rated doors specially made to withstand the extreme heat of fires. These hollow metal doors and frames must have a closing device and latch. Fire doors are often equipped with panic hardware and fail-safe emergency exit locks. Unless used on buildings with certain applications that allow delayed or controlled egress, they must allow free egress. Though they must meet certain safety standards, fire doors may be used for normal daily use at exterior entry points and interior locations within the building.

Fire doors are required on many commercial buildings in order to protect occupants, block the spread of flames and smoke, and minimize the overall property damage. Because they close automatically when a fire is detected in the building, these doors are a key component of a building’s passive fire protection system. Interior fire doors help block or delay the spread of heat, smoke and flames through hallways, stairwells and between sections of the building. They are also installed in corridors passing through fire barrier walls. Exterior fire protection doors are heat resistant and allow quick egress from the building in case of an emergency.

Commercial Fire Door Requirements

Fire-rated doors are considered an important part of a passive fire protection system, and along with being a smart safety feature, they are also required by local, state, national and international building codes. The building codes enforced in your area mandate the fire resistance rating of the fire door assembly. Guidelines are based on the application of the commercial space and the maximum number of occupants within the building.

Review the related fire door assembly requirements in Pennsylvania.

Fire-Resistance Requirements

Unlike regular commercial doors, these must pass a series of fire-resistance tests carried out by specialized testing agencies. Doors that pass evaluation are classified according to their fire protection rating. This rating is measured in hours; .5, .75, 1, 1.5 and 3 hours are common classifications. The measurement represents the amount of time the barrier can stand up to exposure from heat and flames.

The amount of time that a door must withstand fire can vary depending on local building codes and location within the building, such as vicinity to an exit or the fire rating of nearby walls.

Fire Door Certification

Each fire-rated door sold on the market must include a permanent label showing the following information:

  • The door manufacturer,
  • Whether the opening is equipped with fire exit hardware,
  • Any temperature rise rating,
  • If it is a smoke door assembly, and
  • The length of time that the door is intended to resist fire.
  • The related hardware and frame must have similar labeling specifically stating the duration.

Fire Door Inspection

These protective doors need to be inspected at least once a year by a representative from the local fire department.

Types of Fire Doors

There are a variety of types of doors available, with different fire ratings and made from different materials. The door assembly may also include fire-resistant doorframes, hinges, smoke or gas seals, hardware and glazing. Different styles of doors are available, which can either match the interior decor or stand out so they’re easy to notice in an emergency.

Implementing Fire Door Safety

Many business owners and property managers have questions about how fire doors should be used day to day. Here are clear answers to some common concerns.

Do fire doors need to be closed at all times?

Some companies have interior fire doors that typically remain open between departments during the normal business hours, but they will automatically close in the event of an emergency. If the door is not equipped with an automatic closing device, do not prop it open. While it can be convenient to put a wedge in to keep a fire door open creating an easy exit or to let in a breeze, an open door can defeat its fire-protection capabilities.

Should fire doors be locked?

Don’t block it or lock it. Chaining the doors shut or blocking them in any way is dangerous and may be a violation of fire safety codes. Using anything other than fire-rated, fail-safe hardware can lead to injury or even loss of life in an emergency requiring quick evacuation. Finding the doors blocked can be a significant safety hazard and cause further panic for an already scared crowd.

Can we make changes to the door frame or hardware?

Because fire-resistant they are tested as complete door assemblies, permitted onsite modifications are limited.

When do fire doors need to be replaced?

The overall fire resistance and rating of a fire door may deteriorate over time. To ensure that the door is well maintained and still ensures adequate protection, these doors must be inspected yearly. Follow the recommended maintenance and repair schedule. The need for replacement will depend on the wear and tear that it experiences.

Commercial Doors & Hardware

Great Valley Lockshop can help your company find the fire doors that are right for your building and budget. Since 1973, we have had a strong commitment to residential and commercial service. Call our store at 610-644-5334 or get a free estimate online.

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